Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy or MBCT is a type of psychotherapy treatment that combines cognitive therapy, meditation, and mindfulness.  MBCT helps people see the difference between beliefs, thoughts, and feelings, which can, in turn, significantly help in freeing them from unhelpful patterns of behavior.

MBCT is grounded in the belief that it is a person’s perception of events – rather than the events themselves – that determines how he or she will feel and act in response.

MBCT can help with:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Phobias
  • Obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD)
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Substance dependency
  • Persistent pain
  • Disordered eating
  • Sexual issues
  • Anger management issues

Most people with clearly defined behavioral and emotional concerns tend to reap the benefits of MBCT. If any of the above issues resonate with you, I encourage you to try mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

With MBCT, you’ll be able to identify and adjust the thoughts that directly influence your emotions and behavior. This adjustment process is referred to as cognitive reconstructing, which happens through different CBT techniques.

Some MBCT techniques are:

  • Awareness of thoughts and emotions
  • Challenging beliefs
  • Relaxation
  • Meditation
  • Mindfulness
  • Social, physical and thinking exercises

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy is much more than sitting and talking about whatever comes to mind during a session. MBCT sessions are structured to ensure that the therapist and the person in treatment are focused on the different goals of each session, which in turn ensures that each and every session is productive.

If you or someone you know would benefit from mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, please contact me today. I would be happy to speak with you about how I may be able to help.

FAQ

What is Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy?

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is a form of psychotherapy that combines cognitive therapy with mindfulness practices, such as meditation and yoga. The goal of MBCT is to help individuals become more aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment, in order to break the cycle of negative thoughts and emotions that can lead to depression and anxiety. MBCT has been found to be effective in reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and in preventing relapses of these conditions. It is often used in combination with medication and other forms of therapy.

 

How does Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy work?

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) works by teaching individuals to become more aware of their thoughts and emotions in the present moment, and to observe them without judgment. This awareness can help individuals recognize patterns of negative thinking that can lead to depression and anxiety, and learn to respond to these thoughts differently.

MBCT combines elements of cognitive therapy, which focuses on identifying and changing negative thought patterns, with mindfulness practices such as meditation and yoga. Participants in MBCT typically engage in daily mindfulness practices, such as body scan, breathing meditation and yoga exercises, and group discussions. The therapist will also guide participants to become more aware of their thoughts and emotions during the sessions.

MBCT also emphasizes the importance of learning to be non-judgmental and accepting of one’s thoughts and emotions, rather than trying to suppress or control them. This approach can help individuals develop a more balanced relationship with their thoughts and emotions, and can lead to a reduction in symptoms of depression and anxiety. Additionally, MBCT also help to increase awareness of the mind-body connection, which is useful in managing physical symptoms associated with depression and anxiety.

When is Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy needed?

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is often used to help individuals who have a history of depression or anxiety, particularly those who have had multiple episodes of these conditions or are at risk of relapse. MBCT is also effective in treating individuals who have depression and anxiety comorbidity.

MBCT is also used to help individuals who have symptoms of depression or anxiety that have not responded well to other forms of treatment, such as medication or talk therapy. MBCT can also be used as a preventative measure for individuals who have experienced depression or anxiety in the past and want to reduce their risk of relapse.

MBCT can also be beneficial for individuals who are experiencing stress, chronic pain, insomnia, and other physical or psychological conditions that may be related to their mental well-being. MBCT can also be used as a self-help tool for individuals who want to improve their overall well-being and quality of life.

It is important to note that MBCT is not recommended for individuals who are currently experiencing severe symptoms of depression or anxiety, or for those who have a history of suicidal thoughts or behaviors. In these cases, other forms of treatment, such as medication or intensive therapy, may be more appropriate.

 

How much does Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy cost?

The cost of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can vary depending on a number of factors, such as where you live, the type of practitioner providing the therapy, and whether you are paying for the therapy out-of-pocket or through insurance.

MBCT is typically provided by trained and licensed mental health professionals such as psychologists, social workers, and counselors, and the cost of therapy sessions can vary depending on the practitioner’s level of training and experience.

In the United States, the average cost of a therapy session ranges from $75 to $250, with some practitioners charging more or less. Some practitioners offer sliding scale fees based on clients’ income. My rates are $140 for the first initial intake assessment and then $130 for each individual therapy follow-up session.

If you have health insurance, it may cover some or all of the cost of MBCT. Many insurance plans will cover at least a portion of the cost of therapy sessions, but it can vary depending on the type of plan and the practitioner’s qualifications.

It’s also worth noting that some MBCT programs are offered on a low-cost or sliding scale fee basis, and some may be offered for free by non-profit organizations, community centers, or other groups.

It’s a good idea to check with your insurance provider to find out what type of coverage is available for MBCT and to contact the practitioner directly for their fees and if they offer a sliding scale.

How long does the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy process take?

The length of time that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) takes can vary depending on the individual and their specific needs. Typically, MBCT is delivered in a group format and sessions are typically held once a week for eight weeks, with each session lasting around two hours. The program also includes daily home practices of mindfulness exercises, such as body scan, breathing meditation and yoga exercises that typically takes 30 minutes to an hour.

Some MBCT programs may offer additional sessions or follow-up sessions to support maintenance and continued progress.

It’s important to note that MBCT is not a one-time treatment. The skills and practices learned in MBCT are meant to be continued and practiced regularly as a way of maintaining mental well-being. Regular practice of mindfulness can help to prevent relapses and improve overall well-being.

It’s also worth noting that while MBCT is typically an 8-week program, some practitioners may offer longer or shorter program depending on the specific needs of the individual.

 

How do I know if Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy is right for me?

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can be an effective treatment for individuals who have a history of depression or anxiety, particularly those who have had multiple episodes of these conditions or are at risk of relapse. It can also be helpful for individuals who have symptoms of depression or anxiety that have not responded well to other forms of treatment, such as medication or talk therapy. Additionally, MBCT can be beneficial for individuals who are experiencing stress, chronic pain, insomnia, and other physical or psychological conditions that may be related to their mental well-being. However, it’s not suitable for everyone and it’s important to consider the following:

Consult with a mental health professional: A mental health professional, such as a therapist, psychologist or psychiatrist can help you determine whether MBCT is right for you. They can also rule out other conditions that might be causing your symptoms and offer alternative treatment options if needed.

Consider your current mental and emotional state: If you are currently experiencing severe symptoms of depression or anxiety, or have a history of suicidal thoughts or behaviors, MBCT may not be the best treatment option for you. It’s important to address these symptoms with more intensive treatment such as medication or intensive therapy.

Assess your willingness and ability to commit to the program: MBCT is a structured program that involves regular participation in group sessions, daily home practice and a commitment to making lifestyle changes. It’s important to consider whether you have the time and resources to commit to the program before starting.

Be honest with yourself about your motivation: MBCT is a self-help tool that requires personal responsibility and motivation. It’s important to have a clear understanding of why you want to participate in MBCT and what you hope to achieve from the program.

If MBCT is not a good fit for you, your mental health professional can offer alternative treatment options and help you find a treatment that works best for you.